He was a remarkable writer, an author, as well as one of the most popular poets of the interwar period.

The co-founder of the cabaret “Pod Pikadorem”, and the poetry group “Skamander”. Collaborator of the weekly “Wiadomości Literackie” and “Cyrulik Warszawski”. A translator of Russian, French, German and Latin poetry. A classic of Polish children’s literature, author of poems, among others “Locomotive”, “Bird Radio”, “Mr. Hilary”, “Elephant Trąbalski”, and “Bambo”. He signed his works with over 40 pseudonyms!
He was a genius of the Polish language, an iconoclast, and a revolutionist. The first mass poet, creating cabaret skits and satires. His texts and poems are present in popular culture up to date. Tuwim is valued especially for his humour, revealing his sharp mind, and a fresh approach.
He was also a mystic of words, experimenting with language. He looked for expressions that sounded similar in different languages with different meanings. This pursued his linguistic fascination until the end of his life. He liked to create neologisms himself, to which – as he believed – we had an a priori access, everybody according to their own association.

He was also a mystic of words, experimenting with language. He looked for expressions that sounded similar in different languages with different meanings. This pursued his linguistic fascination until the end of his life. He liked to create neologisms himself, to which – as he believed – we had an a priori access, everybody according to their own association.

Tuwim’s poetry is not easy due to the play of words, and the multiplication of their meanings. He masterfully applied rhythmic and the rustle of the Polish words. He also wrote in colloquial and even vulgar language, for example a poem “To a simple man” or “A poem in which the author politely but firmly pleads with numerous groups of neighbors to kiss his ass”.
He remained a Jew who wrote in Polish forever. Until the end of his life, he faced his double identity. He was attacked both by Poles and Jews. In the interwar period, he was accused of forcing Jewish subject into the Polish literature. At the same time, Jews treated him as a traitor who chose to be Polish. Tuwim wrote about his identity and nationality, among others in his poem “Mother”:

He is in the cemetery in Łódź,
At the Jewish cemetery,
Polish grave of my mother,
My Jewish mother.

We, Polish Jews. I can hear the question immediately: ‘Why US?’ A question that is not baseless. Jews ask me, the ones whom I always told that I was a Pole, and now the question will be asked of me by the Poles, for the greatest part of whom I have been and will be a Jew.